Grammar Checker: Use It, Don’t Abuse It

While you can enlist the power of the Grammar Checker, you really shouldn’t depend on the Grammar Checker alone.

First, let’s think about writing.

We have different “styles” of writing, just as we have different “styles” of talking.  With friends we can be casual and a little careless with our conversation, utilizing slang and short-cut speech.  With bosses in the workplace, people tend to be more careful about their speech and are even more careful when dealing with clients and customers.  In formal situations–marriages and speeches at conferences/seminars and the like–our speech tends to be extremely formal.

Our day-to-day writing is the same way.  We have text messages and notes to friends, emails in the work setting, and project analyses with a visual presentation and an additional pamphlet/brochure for those who attended the meeting.

A text message is “tossed off”, requiring little thought.  Emails can be tossed off, but most people consider what they need to say and the best way to say it.  People also use better grammar when writing emails and other business communication.  Presentations, however, require carefully thought-out information, highly organized and edited both for content and grammar.

The intuitive grammar checker with our text messages often causes more hilarity and miscommunication than we want–actual proof that grammar is important.

Most emails might have a few errors but not in the crucial comments, which are carefully worded.  Emails can be used in a court of law, and most business people are aware of the necessity of saying exactly what is meant, no more and no less.

Project analyses and presentations will be viewed and judged critically by others–especially customers who keep businesses in business.  These “public” communications will be proofed for mistakes.  The credibility of the business and its employees are judged in a myriad of ways.  If a business puts out a slipshod presentation, most people will believe that the business’ product will be equally slipshod.

As I noted in the introduction to the Grammar Monster blogs, back in August, the English language has too many fluid factors for complete coding of a software program.  While an app’s grammar checker might be sufficient for an email or a draft, the final presentation needs “eyes-on” by the members of the team.  Grammar checkers can’t catch everything.

As proof, on October 31 is a lesson that I used to give to my students:  a paragraph into which I inserted errors that the software’s grammar checker will not spot.  While it finds many errors, it doesn’t find them all.

Check it for yourself.  Type the paragraph below, the one under the heading ‘Grammar Checkers’, into your own word processing software.  Fix all of the errors that you find.  See how your software works for checking errors.  In any MS Word program, you will find the grammar checker under the Review Tab, called “Spelling and Grammar” with a check mark.

Notice that the grammar checker built into this website software found only two errors, with one repeated.

You have an additional week to enlist additional “eyes on”, if you so desire.

At the end of this week, after you have fixed the errors you found and run the grammar checker,  download the document in the Oct. 31 blog.  That document, on its last page, will exhibit what the software “caught” as well as what it missed.

Have fun!

Grammar Checkers

Computer grammer checkers has one fault: they doesn’t decide on the write answer for you.  Designed to identify a potential problem, a writer mistakenly believes that they can depend upon the computer software to spot all their errors.  When running the grammer checker, it is up to the writer to except or reject the programs’ suggestions.  They are often many errors witch the program don’t find.  Being that sometimes your in such a hurry to finish.  If a writer ain’t careful or through, you may miss several misteaks.  To defeat this built-in problem, each writer must became aware of there owing errors and he/she must learn to avoid them.  When submitting essays for evaluation, a writer must remember that content and organization or not the basis only for grading.  Him having correct grammar, mechanics, and usage are of sometimes even grater impotence.