WIS Summer

July and August are summer vacation for Home School Helps.

September resumes our blogs.

After taking a couple of summer months off, we start back with 13 bits of Pro Writer Advice.

Red Ink

These first blogs that move from summer to fall are designed for the writing people, especially the ones gearing up for National Novel Writing Month in November.

 

NaNoWriMo is an intensive, 1666 words per day push to complete the first draft of a manuscript. If you’ve never heard of NaNoWriMo, you’ll need to do a little prepwork to investigate, and if you’ve always dreaming of finishing that novel jumping on your shoulder, November is a great month for the push.

Most writing people muse their way through September, and our planned blogs will help. October is the time to gather and prep all the background for November’s big push.

October is the Grand School Month

If you’re just starting home school, if you want to start with grammar but don’t know what to do, Home School Helps won’t leave you hanging through the summer months.

Here’s what you can do. Go back and check out what the year has covered.

The Punctuation series started in January with Sentence Starters.  Since then, we’ve covered Keyboard Clues, Sentence Enders, Sentence Considerations including variety and length, the Ellipsis and Asterisk, followed with the Colon (including Analogies), and the Semicolon.  We continued with a short series on the Type I Errors, those all-important main ideas of every sentence that require truly understanding your own writing.  And we finished  June with the classic blog “Grammar Phobia or Grammar Snobbery?” (Classic only in that this blog is one that will repeat yearly from Writers Ink.  We think it’s that important)

Monster Monday
public domain image

New blogs in the Monster Monday series will resume in October with the suitably-for-Halloween monstrous comma.  We will follow that with the Short-cutters (including the apostrophe) and finishing with Special Marks.

When it’s easy to find exercises but not so easy to find explanations for all situations, the HSHelps area of Writers Ink is here to help.

Don’t forget to check out the Pro Writer Advice.

As always, you can email us at winkbooks@aol.com.  In the subject line, please state your concern.

See you in September!

(Wait!  That’s from a song! Do you know it? If you go farther back into the WIS blog archive, you’ll find a whole series on poetry, including occasional poems and popular songs by Dolly Parton, Sting, Cold Play, the Eagles, Judy Collins, and more. These can serve as free guided literature lessons for home schoolers, especially when the student applies the lesson focus to other songs. Students can select another song and work on their own.  For assistance, just email us, and we’ll respond!)

 

Old Geeky Greeks and Creative Writing

Old Geeky Greeks:  Write Stories Using Ancient Techniques

Here’s A List For Aspiring Writers
public domain image, original located at the National Gallery of Art in D.C.
John Singer Sargent’s sketch for his 1902 sculpture of Perseus holding Medusa’s head

Blood tragedies.

Atonement.

I, Robot.

Harry Potter.

Ironman.

Hubris.

The 13th Warrior.

The scariest woman in all literature.

The Hobbit.

Dudley Dooright.

5 Stages of the Hero . . . and the Monster.

Jurassic Park, in all its iterations.

What Do The Items In This Oddly-Matched List Have In Common?

These stories all have origins with the ancient Greeks and Romans.

Sitting around fires after a day of hunting and gathering, the first writers developed techniques to influence their audiences.

Those techniques have thousands of years of use and still hold true for capturing audiences.

The ancient Greeks (and Romans) of classical antiquity viewed the stories and dramas that were enduring.  And just like writers today, they searched and defined and classified the best techniques to create writings that pleased their audiences.

These old geeky Greeks laid the foundations.  Many of their techniques are still in use. Ideas original to them are re-packaged as glittery infographics and Wham-Pow webinars and three-point seminars with exclusive insights to Buy Now!

Clear And Quick Information

Old Geeky Greeks: Write Stories with Ancient Techniques presents such ideas as the Blood Tragedy and dulce et utile in a clear, organized method for writers who want to write rather than invest hours getting three snippets of information.

Chapters in OGG cover understanding characters to the five stages that established the modern protagonist from the ancient hero.  Aristotle’s requirements for plot precede a survey of the oldest plot formula, the Blood (or Revenge) Tragedy.  Concepts such as in medias res and dulce et utile can help writers solve sticky problems and develop new ideas.

Old Geeky Greeks (and Romans) looked at successful plays and other story-telling methods to determine what influenced the audience.

  • Which characters were still talked about weeks and months after a performance?
  • Which play structures failed—and which were consistently winners?
  • And which ideas helped writers develop their celebrated writings?
Writers Today Are Still Searching For The Answers To These Questions.

The bright minds of Classical Antiquity first explored these questions.  Their answers are applicable even in the age of the internet, open-source software, special effects, and infographics.

Aristotle, Seneca, Plato, Horace, and many other ancient geeks have their ideas matched to Harry Potter, AvatarLast of the Mohicans, and Shakespeare.

Whether we’re writing novels or plays, blogs or non-fiction, poems and songs, Old Geeky Greeks (written by M.A. Lee and Emily R. Dunn) is a seminar in 28,000 words, just published on Amazon Kindle.

Buy it here!

John Singer Sargent’s sketch for his 1902 sculpture of Perseus with Medusa’s head, provides the cover art for OGG.