WIS Summer

July and August are summer vacation for Home School Helps.

September resumes our blogs.

After taking a couple of summer months off, we start back with 13 bits of Pro Writer Advice.

Red Ink

These first blogs that move from summer to fall are designed for the writing people, especially the ones gearing up for National Novel Writing Month in November.

 

NaNoWriMo is an intensive, 1666 words per day push to complete the first draft of a manuscript. If you’ve never heard of NaNoWriMo, you’ll need to do a little prepwork to investigate, and if you’ve always dreaming of finishing that novel jumping on your shoulder, November is a great month for the push.

Most writing people muse their way through September, and our planned blogs will help. October is the time to gather and prep all the background for November’s big push.

October is the Grand School Month

If you’re just starting home school, if you want to start with grammar but don’t know what to do, Home School Helps won’t leave you hanging through the summer months.

Here’s what you can do. Go back and check out what the year has covered.

The Punctuation series started in January with Sentence Starters.  Since then, we’ve covered Keyboard Clues, Sentence Enders, Sentence Considerations including variety and length, the Ellipsis and Asterisk, followed with the Colon (including Analogies), and the Semicolon.  We continued with a short series on the Type I Errors, those all-important main ideas of every sentence that require truly understanding your own writing.  And we finished  June with the classic blog “Grammar Phobia or Grammar Snobbery?” (Classic only in that this blog is one that will repeat yearly from Writers Ink.  We think it’s that important)

Monster Monday
public domain image

New blogs in the Monster Monday series will resume in October with the suitably-for-Halloween monstrous comma.  We will follow that with the Short-cutters (including the apostrophe) and finishing with Special Marks.

When it’s easy to find exercises but not so easy to find explanations for all situations, the HSHelps area of Writers Ink is here to help.

Don’t forget to check out the Pro Writer Advice.

As always, you can email us at winkbooks@aol.com.  In the subject line, please state your concern.

See you in September!

(Wait!  That’s from a song! Do you know it? If you go farther back into the WIS blog archive, you’ll find a whole series on poetry, including occasional poems and popular songs by Dolly Parton, Sting, Cold Play, the Eagles, Judy Collins, and more. These can serve as free guided literature lessons for home schoolers, especially when the student applies the lesson focus to other songs. Students can select another song and work on their own.  For assistance, just email us, and we’ll respond!)

 

Punctuation : New Eyes for Old Codes

Monster Monday :: Using Punctuation

Grammar Monster asks this Essential Question: How do the primary punctuation codes function in 5 different purposes?

This means “Squared-off Turn Ahead.” What it doesn’t say is “slow down; tricky turn to maneuver through.”

1: Starters

2: Enders

3: Links that Separate

4: Short-Cutters

5: Special Marks

Here’s a new way to look at Punctuation.

All the punctuation marks basically perform 5 functions.  And all the punctuation rules fit into those five functions.  Figure out what the mark is doing and the reason it needs to be done, and punctuation will never be a mystery again.

Here’s another new way to look at Punctuation.

Every line of text that you read is like a road.  As you read, you drive along that road.

Continue reading “Punctuation : New Eyes for Old Codes”